Changes in Ordinary Chinese Homes in the Past 70 Years

China in the 1950s: Typical Chinese factory workers’ home in big cities.

COMMENTS FROM MINDS

Eric
Nice table

All Things Chinese
That is called Eight Immortals’ Table.

Eric
I knew I liked it, now I know why.

China in the 1960s: Typical Chinese factory workers’ home in big cities.

COMMENTS FROM TWITTER

ρнιℓιρ мαк
Without that picture and fake windows, it could pass as a Slavic home.

China in the 1970s: Typical Chinese factory workers’ home in big cities. Sewing machine became a common household commodity.

COMMENTS FROM MINDS

soxfan1957
I remember my mom doing a lot of sewing in the 1960s. I want to learn to sew so I can make myself a fantastic Halloween costume.

China in the 1980s: Typical Chinese factory workers’ home in big cities. Fridge and television became a common household commodity.

China in the 1990s: Chinese ordinary workers’ home in the cities.

China in the 21s century: Chinese ordinary worker’s home.

COMMENTS FROM MINDS

Eric
Even have a smart TV. Ha the smarter the TV the dumber we become.

All Things Chinese
I can’t argue with you on that …

Channel 9 is an Aussie version of Fox, for the power & money chasing neocons, while ABC is an Aussie version of CNN, representing a mentally violent & emotionally vicious extreme left wings. Their 60 Minutes and 4 Corners are equally biased and sensational.

Journalists in Australia’s surveys over trustworthiness are consistently ranked in the bottom, slightly better than used car salesmen. Of course, not all Aussie journalists are untrustworthy, some are quite professional and fair. At least the guys who reported the survey results are rather honest – I just wonder how they felt when they typed their reports.

The situation in China, as far as I’ve learned, is quite similar. In fact, worse.

Most journalists working for corporate media in the West try to brainwash their audience, and they’ve done so in a sincere manner because they are, by and large, not smart people and have believed their own bullshit (the rhetoric of the new-aga cult that they follow), so their brainwash mission and smear campaign are often rather successful.

On the other hand, many Chinese journalists, while also trying to brainwash their audience, do not believe what they said. It is not because they are smarter than their counterparts in the West but dumber. They worship the rich and powerful and have been brainwashed by their Western rivals.

soxfan1957
One has to be careful these days and find the facts and not the opinions. Even the “fact finders” can’t be trusted anymore. The old adage “Actions speak louder than words” is probably the best way of seeing the truth.

Eric
Yes, talk is cheap and in the west virtue-signalling is the thing. Ha, think Trudumb for an example. It is a person’s actions that matter not their words.

All Things Chinese
Yes, nowadays, journalists do not have a monopoly on reporting and explaining any events. Often they are not the best people to describe an occurrence than those who have witnessed or lived through the events, or researchers who are specialised in the subject.

What’s more? In the mass media age, they don’t even have an exclusive right to broadcast their explanations and opinions. Yet many of them still don’t know what they don’t know and reckon their audience/readers won’t know what they don’t know.

Eric
Journalists should report what happens and not their opinions of why or how as they are then reporting through their own bias Lenz, report the facts and I will choose my own opinion, thank you kindly, dear journalist.

All Things Chinese
I couldn’t agree more with you. It is the abuse of journalistic power by knowingly publishing selective/biased reports or deliberately confusing facts with opinion.

(Images downloaded online, source: 光明日报)

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